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Ring for Peace Magazine

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II-07 | “Slavery is not a horror safely confined to the past”

Human trafficking is a business that is flourishing all over the world, even in Europe, because it has low risks and high profits, as Spanish social worker Alejandra Acosta explains. She is the founder of the organization “Break the Silence” that fights against trafficking and modern slavery.

II-06 | Intergene­rational Dialogue on Humanitarianism

What is humanitarianism to you, and why is it important to engage in humanitarian work? And what is your message to people who have lost hope in doing humanitarian work? Two of many questions Dr. Vinu Aram and Dr. Renz Argao were happy to answer in our third “Intergenerational Dialogue”.

II-05 | “We cannot afford to ignore religion when it comes to peace and conflict”

Human Rights can never be “won” because there are always people who will fight hard to reverse any gains made, says Andrew Gilmour. Learn, why the head of the Berghof Foundation thinks nations should prepare their population mentally for a rising migration.

II-04 | Intergene­rational Dialogue on Peace and Security

“How do you feel about the future? What do you see ahead of us? Are you confident or are you doubtful?”, moderator Ana Clara Giovani asks the two guests of our Intergenerational Dialogue on Peace and Security right in the beginning. The answers differ.

II-03 | What makes a person young and what makes a person old, Philbert Aganyo?

Philbert Aganyo is the team leader from Religions for Peace’s Youth Media Team. But considering his age, one might say es is not that young any more? But is age the crucial factor for leadership? Learn what he thinks about the difference between age and youth.

II-02 | Jeffrey Sachs: “We are at a critical juncture”

Jeffrey Sachs takes the old generations to task: those who are now in power must act. Read also why a decision by the German Federal Constitutional Court should set a precedent worldwide.

II-01 | Intergene­rational Dialogue on Environment

Ela Gandhi and Eda Molla Chousein are the two guests on the first “Dialogue of the Generations” video talk. They discuss how their two generations think differently and in the same way about environmental protection.

I-11 | Ani Zonneveld: “Universal human rights values and true Islam is one and the same”

She is the first Malaysian Grammy winner and founded the non-profit organization Muslims for Progressive Values. This organization calls for Muslim societies to pay more attention to human rights. Learn why many young Muslims like Zonneveld believe Islam needs reform.

I-10 | Rachel Rosenbluth: “I call on men to speak less and to listen more”

Rachel Rosenbluth is one of the first Jewish women to be ordained as a rabbi by an orthodox institution in Israel. Read why she sees herself as a bridge builder and how she accepted the invitation to participate in a ten-day Sufi pilgrimage festival in India.

I-9 | Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati: “I used to think God only lived in the mountains”

Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati tells us, why she moved to India and why she thinks that the situation of women in India has improved in the past 25 years.

I-8 | Sharon Rosen: “Collaborating side by side on a joint problem provides religious actors with a sense of purpose”

Read, what Sharon Rosen thinks is the difference between practical work and dialogue. And what is necessary for a fruitful conversation between religions.

I-7 | Antje Jackelén: “Too many people are drinking from a very poisonous cocktail”

Learn, what’s behind the five Ps that make the poisonous cocktail too many people are drinking of right now. The Archbishop of the Church of Sweden also explains, why she recommends cultivating resilience, coexistence and hope to deal with this poisonous cocktail.

 

I-6 | Sima Samar: “I believe women are one of the main reasons for continuation of humanity”

She was the first Minister of Women’s Affairs in Afghanistan after the Taliban lost power in 2002. Ever since, for many women in Afghanistan almost everything changed, as Sima Samar recapitulates in this interview.

I-5 | Gunnar Stålsett: “Rights of women is a religious, moral, and political imperative in the 21st century”

The ecumenical unity of the churches depends in particular on the question of the extent to which women and men are equal, explains former Bishop Gunnar Stålsett. Stålsett believes that for women in the Orthodox Church to have more rights, a religious leader is needed who is willing to risk his own future for the future of the Church.

I-4 | Azza Karam: “Working with religious actors makes sense”

Learn why Prof. Azza Karam thinks that it is inevitable for the UN to work with religious leaders and movements. And find out what challenges Azza Karam identifies for women, if they pursue religious leaderships.

I-3 | Margrit Wettstein: “All the women here have done something about it, something that has made a difference”

Margrit Wettstein works for the Nobel Prize Museum in Stockholm. Only few people know better than her, which women ever received the Nobel Prize and which fates are behind these women. Alexander Görlach asked Margrit Wettstein to tell us, who she thinks are the most important award winners.

I-2 | Margot Käßmann: “Real encounters are often a mutual encouragement”

Margot Käßmann has retired from many offices. Her engagement with Ring for Peace is an exception. Alexander Görlach talks with the former regional bishop about peace, women, fundamentalism and why the assembly in Lindau can make a difference.

I-1 | Annette Schavan: “Strengthen the com­­­­­­­mitment of women at all levels”

The future of religions will be determined by how they integrate women, says Annette Schavan, former Federal Minister for Research and Education. The committed Catholic was also the Federal Republic’s ambassador to the Apostolic See.

Ring for Peace Magazine

The Ring for Peace magazine is published at loose intervals. It contains interviews, video talks and guest contributions.

Two issues have been published so far:

  1. Issue I: Transforming Tomorrow
  2. Issue II: Generations in Dialogue